Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Vestas Windfarm Projects


Vestas passes 1GW mark for wind orders in Australia in 2018, with 184MW WA project

Global wind energy giant Vestas notched up more than 1GW of turbine orders in Australia over the course of 2018, as the large-scale renewable energy market continues to boom Down Under.

The company reached the milestone in late December, after winning the engineering, procurement and construction contract to build a 184MW wind farm in Western Australia, a project being developed by Bright Energy Investments.

The Warradarge Wind Farm, which is on track to begin construction later this year in the state’s mid-west, has since been given the green light by the WA state government



The site for the wind farm, near the town of Eneabba, has been praised by both Vestas and newly appointed state energy minister Bill Johnston for its “abundant” wind resource.

“The wind farm will have a total output of 180 megawatts with a 50pc capacity factor – the equivalent of the average annual electricity needs of 135,000 WA homes,” Johnston said in comments earlier this month.

“The state government remains committed to ensuring a transition to a renewable energy future at the lowest cost possible to WA taxpayers.

“By developing renewables projects, we are demonstrating our commitment to ensuring our State meets its 2020 Large-scale Renewable Energy Target obligations.”

Vestas says the project will feature 51 V136-3.45MW turbines delivered in 3.6MW Power Optimised Mode with hub heights of 84 meters to maximise performance in its specific wind conditions.

The wind farm also signals a new focus for Vestas on the WA market , which has lagged behind the rest of Australia on large-scale wind and solar installations.

This happily coincides with a new focus on large-scale renewables by the Labor McGowan government, which late last year opened up the state’s south-west interconnected network to just under 1GW of new big solar and wind, and appointed a new energy minister – Johnston – to shepherd the process.



“We are extremely pleased to work with Bright Energy Investments on this project,” said Vestas Asia Pacific President Clive Turton in comments.

“It has extraordinary wind conditions and will make an important contribution to powering Western Australia with competitive renewable energy.

“After the Warradarge Wind Farm comes online, Vestas will have an installed base of 561MW in Western Australia, expanding our service footprint and capability to support future projects in the state.”

Bright Energy Investments (BEI) is a joint venture between state-owned gen-tailer Synergy, global infrastructure fund DIF and super fund Cbus.

The group’s general manager of investments, Tom Frood, said the “high calibre of the parties involved” and the appointment of Vestas would ensure that wind farm was delivered on-schedule.

“Synergy has a strong history in Western Australian solar and wind assets, and is committed to increasing its renewable energy portfolio, and Vestas’ rich industry expertise and proven track record will ensure that the first power generation is on track for 2020”.

Vestas has also signed up to a 30-year Active Output Management 5000 (AOM 5000) service agreement, designed to maximise energy production for the lifetime of the project.


Monday, April 8, 2019

Warradarge Wind Farm


THE Shire of Coorow is welcoming of the State Government’s announcement that it has given the go-ahead for construction to begin at the 180-megawatt Warradarge Wind Farm, near Eneabba.

The Warradarge Wind Farm has been recognised as one of the best renewable energy projects in Australia due to its location and abundant wind resource, according to Energy Minister Bill Johnston.

Its 51 turbines will be among the largest in WA with a tip height of 152 metres, sporting some of the longest blades onshore at 66 metres.


Coorow Shire president Moira Girando, Marchagee, said any investment into the region was welcome especially if it would create local jobs and boost tourism.

Ms Girando said the Shire had a declining population and she hoped that the renewable energy industry could create more employment in the area to help control that.

She said the Shire has a “long term (10 year) plan” to install solar panels on “all council run buildings”, staging it so as not to be a burden on ratepayers.

In the announcement made before Christmas, Mr Johnston said the Warradarge Wind Farm project would be funded and developed by Bright Energy Investments (BEI) – a partnership between Synergy and the private sector launched by the State Government in April.

Mr Johnston said the sustainable energy solutions company Vestas, which claims “more than 17 per cent of the global installed base” from wind farms, has been awarded the engineering, procurement and construction, as well as operations and maintenance contracts.

“I’m delighted to announce the construction of the Warradarge Wind Farm will be going ahead and will create up to 200 jobs for Western Australians,” Mr Johnston said.

“The wind farm will have a total output of 180 megawatts with a 50pc capacity factor – the equivalent of the average annual electricity needs of 135,000 WA homes.

“The State Government remains committed to ensuring a transition to a renewable energy future at the lowest cost possible to WA taxpayers.

“By developing renewables projects, we are demonstrating our commitment to ensuring our State meets its 2020 Large-scale Renewable Energy Target obligations.”

Western Power will construct the 10-kilometre transmission line from the wind farm sub-station to the network connection point near Eneabba.

Other BEI projects include the Albany Grasmere Wind Farm and Greenough River Solar Farm near Geraldton.

Vestas Asia Pacific president Clive Turton said he was “extremely pleased to work with BEI on this project”.


“It has extraordinary wind conditions and will make an important contribution to powering WA with competitive renewable energy,” Mr Turton said.

“After the Warradarge Wind Farm comes online, Vestas will have an installed base of 561 megawatt in WA, expanding our service footprint and capability to support future projects in the State.”

BEI general manager Tom Frood was confident that the Warradarge Wind Farm would be delivered “smoothly and on-schedule”.

“Synergy has a strong history in WA solar and wind assets, and is committed to increasing its renewable energy portfolio, and Vestas’ rich industry expertise and proven track record will ensure that the first power generation is on track for 2020,” Mr Frood said.

Commercial operations at Warradarge Wind Farm are scheduled to commence in the third quarter of 2020.

The specifics announcement by the State Government were somewhat different to the details in the Urbis Planning Compliance Report 2012.

The report however said that “the proposed Warradarge Wind Farm will result in minimal onsite modification to the existing rural landform and minimal modification to vegetation in the Rural zone” in the Shire of Coorow.

“Whilst it is acknowledged that the Wind Farm will be visible from surrounding local and regional locations, these views are limited as a consequence of the distance of the site from developed areas such as Coorow, Leeman, Greenhead, Eneabba and Carnamah,” it said.

 The State government has given the go-ahead for construction to begin at the 180-megawatt Warradarge Wind Farm, near Eneabba.

The project will be funded and developed by Bright Energy Investments (BEI) - a partnership between Synergy and the private sector launched by the McGowan Government in April.

World-renowned sustainable energy solutions company Vestas has been awarded the engineering, procurement and construction; and operations and maintenance contracts.

The Warradarge Wind Farm is recognised as one of the best renewable energy projects in Australia due to its location and abundant wind resource.

Its 51 turbines will be among the largest in Western Australia with a tip height of 152 metres, sporting some of the longest blades onshore at 66m.

Western Power will construct the 10-kilometre transmission line from the wind farm sub-station to the network connection point near Eneabba.

Other BEI projects include the Albany Grasmere Wind Farm and Greenough River Solar Farm near Geraldton.

Energy Minister Bill Johnston predicted the construction of the wind farm would create up to 200 jobs for Western Australians. 

“The wind farm will have a total output of 180 megawatts with a 50 per cent capacity factor - the equivalent of the average annual electricity needs of 135,000 Western Australian homes,” Mr Johnston said.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Gravel Pit Dandaragan Wind farm


PROPOSED EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY (GRAVEL) – LOT 3 ROWES ROAD, YATHROO 

Location:  Lot 3 Rowes Road, Yathroo 

Applicant:  JAV Brown & Sons 

Folder Path:  Development Services App / Development Application / 2018 / 48

Disclosure of Interest:  Nil 

Date:  10 September 2018 

Author:  Planning Officer  

Senior Officer:  Executive Manager of    Development Services   

PROPOSAL To consider a development application for an extractive industry (gravel) on Lot 3 Rowes Road, Yathroo (the Site).

BACKGROUND The proposal is to be situated in the north-western portion of the property, which is approximately 26km south-south-east from the Dandaragan town-site, and 11km north-east from Regans Ford. The property comprises a total area of 1039.23ha and is accessed via Rowes Rd to the north and Gillingarra Rd to the south. The Site is part of a broad-acre farming property owned and managed by the proponent for livestock grazing and cropping. 

 The Site contains an existing shallow gravel pit of approximately 2.9ha in area that has been used on an irregular basis for gravel extraction by the Shire for road-making materials. The proposal intends to increase this pit to approximately 46.6ha. It is envisaged the gravel would be used as foundation material for further roadmaking and in other infrastructure projects in the locality such as the wind farms.  

 The proponent intends to enter into a commercial arrangement with a suitably experienced civil construction company / extractive industry operator to further develop the gravel resource, rather than undertake gravel extraction directly.

 The Site is zoned Rural under Local Planning Scheme No. 7 (LPS7), where such a land use is “A”; meaning it is not permitted unless the local government has exercised its discretion by granting development approval after giving special notice in accordance with Clause 64 of the Deemed Provisions of LPS7. 

 Planning assessment guidance of an extractive industry proposal outside the Perth and Peel planning regions is provided by the Western Australian Planning Commission’s Fact Sheet - Basic Raw Materials 2016, which states the following considerations are required to be made for an extractive industry proposal:   

• management of air, water, noise and visual impacts;
• location and stability of excavations, stock piles and overburden dumps;
• amenity of adjacent land uses in the local community; and
• rehabilitation of the land consistent with its long-term future use.

 The Environmental Protection Authority’s Guidance Statement No.3 - Separation Distances between Industrial and Sensitive Land Uses (GS3) is referenced by the fact sheet for a generic, non-definite buffer distance of extractive industries. GS3 is intended to provide an approach to minimise the land use conflict between industry, including rural industries and surrounding sensitive land uses. These buffer distances are not a substitute for taking all necessary measures to contain impacts on-site. GS3 provides a buffer distance of 300-500m between extractive industries and sensitive land uses, depending on the size of the operation, as buffer distances are influenced by: site characteristics; the proposed location of infrastructure; access routes; pits and stockpiles; and the extraction method.

 Appendix 1 of the Shire’s Rural Local Planning Strategy 2012 and
Annexure 7 of the Shire’s Draft Local Planning Strategy 2016
both reinforce the above by the listing like matters to be addressed in assessment of applications for extractive industries. 

 COMMENT The Site is surrounded by other Rural zoned properties, with the nearest residence (currently unoccupied) located 850m west from the property boundary and 950m from the proposed pit. This complies with GS3’s recommended buffer distance of 500m from sensitive land uses. The next adjacent residence is located approximately 2.3km northwest. The proposal will also be visually screened by vegetation from the Rowes Road access point, with 350m being the nearest distance the pit is to be located away from the entry.

 The proposal is subject to comply to with the Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997 at all times. The extractive industry is not considered to operate at noises above these regulations given: there will be no blasting activities; operations will only operate during normal daytime business hours, Monday to Saturday; only modern low noise operating machinery will be used; and the proposal complies with the recommended buffer distance.  

 Dust is another major amenity concern of the development. Dust management of site activities will be as follows: 
1. Disturbance of topsoil - this poses the major risk of dust generation given the finer particle size within topsoil. To minimise such generation this activity will be confined to the wetter months, April to October, when the topsoil material would be less likely to be transported by wind due to its moisture content. 
2. Excavation and loading of gravel - residual dust particles during this activity is expected to be locally confined to the pit itself, as the relatively coarse particle size of gravel and its sandy soil matrix isn't conducive to long separation transport by wind; and     
3. Transport of gravel - with the offsite transport route being sealed, dust is easily managed in this activity by sufficiently covering truckloads with tarpaulins. The proponent will ensure internal access ways are maintained to a sufficient compact surface level to limit transport dust generation within the Site.

 Given the proposal seeks to increase gravel extraction by 15 times its current size there needs to be the consideration of the impact of the proposal on biodiversity. The proposal is located within the property confides cleared of remnant vegetation with only a small portion of individual trees and scrubs required to be cleared within the extraction footprint; which are exempted from requiring a clearing permit as they are more than 50m from any other native vegetation. The Site is also not considered to contain priority agricultural land. Further to this, there is also limited impact to ground and surface water from the proposal, as outlined in the points below: 

 There is no apparent water runoff/flooding risk of the pit given the well-drained permeable, low gradient and predominantly gravelly soils contained within. 
  There is no risk of stream sedimentation or other adverse impacts of extraction activities on natural drainage systems due to the significant distance to the nearest watercourses (9km to Moore River and 14km to Caren Brook).  
 The site is sufficiently elevated above the water-table to avoid any possibility of evacuation adversely affecting groundwater systems.   
  No acid sulfate soil conditions occur within the property and the physiography and geology are not conducive to the presence of such. 

 In terms of biosecurity, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development after consultation has recommended the applicant submits a Weed Management Plan to ensure minimal biosecurity risk for the landowner and the adjoining farms along the transport route. This will be required as a condition of development approval. 

 Traffic management is a concern of the proposed development. The Site access and egress would be via Rowes Road, linking onto Dandaragan Road. These access roads proposed are suitable for the volume of traffic and type of heavy vehicles. This route, between Brand Highway and the entrance to the property is 16km in length, all of which is sealed and in good condition, except for approximately 275m of slip road at the access bend to Rowes Road. 

This slip road access to the property shown in the picture below is of concern, Shire officers have sought advice from Main Roads WA – Wheatbelt Regional Office regarding the following issues:    The entry/exit point is on a sweeping 90 degree bend on Rowes Road.   Vegetation limits sight distance for drivers entering Rowes Road.   With the above in mind, there are concerns that the proposed increased number of heavy vehicles entering and existing site onto Rowes Road may not be able to do so in a safe manner. 

To mitigate these traffic issues the applicant has proposed to install appropriate hazard advice signage and remove some roadside vegetation to improve sightlines. Main Roads WA have indicated that the preferred method to improve safety at the intersection could be the installation of a T junction intersection to Rowes Road to be constructed as detailed in the green aerial image overlay below. This would be similar to the intersection with Rowes Road and Bidgerabbie Road some 9km north of the proposed site, which was installed by the Shire through Blackspot Funding due to similar road safety issues.

 These issues need to be discussed further with Main Roads WA, Shire officers and the proponent to clarify exact conditions of approval prior to operations commencing. This may include the proponent having to undertake a road safe audit and concept design for an approved site access with Rowes Road at the cost of the proponent.

The entrance gate will be appropriately secured and signposted for access from authorised persons only and warning of “Heavy Vehicles in Operation” and “Evacuation in Process”. Site visitors will be required to contact loader drivers by CB Radio or the site manager by mobile, and report to the site office. Internally the access is track is an unsealed all weather surface, which as mentioned previously, the proponent will ensure is maintained year round through its contractual arrangements with a third party operator. 

 The proponent notes the predicted number and size of trucks accessing the site will fluctuate with demand for gravel. If the site is successful in winning the future tender to supply the construction of the wind farms, it is anticipated for an approximate six month period that the Site will have an estimated 30 trucks per day with loads varying from 12 to 48 tonnes. After this period the demand is predicted to fall, with only 2-4 trucks predicted to be realised per day. To ensure sustainable road maintenance upkeep of the proponent’s transport route a condition of approval will ensure a fee of 50cents per estimated tonne transported offsite is paid to the Shire annually. 

 The final consideration of the development is rehabilitation post gravel extraction. A condition of approval will ensure the site is restored to its current broadarce farming use. To reinforce this, the proponent will be required to submit a bond/guarantee or other acceptable form of security to the Shire to be held in trust until rehabilitation is undertaken to the Shire’s satisfaction. To assist in rehabilitation the proponent will stockpile topsoil for respreading and levelling during this final process. Shrubs and trees endemic to the area are also proposed to be scatter planted over the Site. 

 Provided the above, it is considered the proposed use is consistent with the intent of the Rural zone given it enables an ancillary rural activity to co-exist with the predominant broadacre use of the land in a manner that will not impact on the rural character and amenity of the area. Furthermore, given gravel extraction is a temporary use, the land can continue to be used for broadacre farming once the extractive industry operation has ceased. Therefore, the extractive industry application is recommended for approval subject to conditions. 

 CONSULTATION

  •   Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development;
  •   Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety;
  •   Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions;
  •  Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage; 
  •  Department of Fire and Emergency Services;
  •  Department of Water and Environmental Regulation;  
  •  Western Power;
  •  Telstra;
  •  Main Roads WA; 
  •  Surrounding landowners; 
  •  Executive Manager Infrastructure; and 
  •  Coordinator Infrastructure Services. 

 Submissions and officer responses to such are detailed in the attached Schedule of Submissions. 

 STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT
 Local Planning Scheme No.7
 Extractive Industries Local Law
 Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997
 Local Government Act 1995

 POLICY IMPLICATIONS  Fact Sheet - Basic Raw Materials 2016  State Planning Policy 2.5 - Rural Planning 2016  Guidance Statement No.3 - Separation Distances between Industrial and Sensitive Land Uses 2005

 FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS The applicant has paid the required planning application fee of $739.00. If Council approves the development application, the applicant will be required to pay a further $500.00 for an extractive industry licence, with an annual licence renewal fee of $300.00, given the pit is greater than the 5ha fee threshold. 

 As discussed previously, the applicant will be required as a condition of the licence to pay the Shire an annual road maintenance contribution fee of 50 cents per tonne transport off site. Given this fee is not listed in the Shire of Dandaragan’s 2018/2019 fee and charges the fee will be advertised for a period of 35 days in accordance with Section 6.19 of the Local Government Act 1995.  

 STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS
 Rural Local Planning Strategy 2012 
 Draft Local Planning Strategy 2016
 2016 – 2026 Strategic Community Plan:

GOAL 1: Great Place for Residential and Business Development Objectives How the Shire will contribute 
1.2    Ensure effective and efficient development and building services 
a)  Process development applications and undertake building regulation functions and services 

Goal 5: Proactive and Leading local Government Objectives How the Shire will contribute 
5.6    Implement sound corporate governance and risk management 
h) Maintain and implement up to date policies and procedures (including delegations) 



ATTACHMENTS Circulated with the agenda are the following Items relevant to this report:
 Development Application (Doc ID: 115366)
 Schedule of Submissions (Doc ID: 117729)
 Additional Rowes Road Access Photos (Doc ID: 118330)  (Marked 9.3.2) 



OFFICER RECOMMENDATION  That Council grant development approval and an Extractive Industry Licence for period of ten (10) years from the date of this approval for an Extractive Industry (Gravel) on Lot 3 Rowes Road, Yathroo subject to the following conditions and advice:
1. All development shall be in accordance with the attached approved plans and specifications dated 27 September 2018 subject to any modifications required as a consequence of any conditions of this approval. The endorsed plans shall not be modified or altered without the prior written approval of the Shire.
2. Hours of operation shall be limited to 6.30am to 5:30pm Monday to Saturday. 
3. No extraction activities are to operate on Sunday and Public Holidays.
4. Maximum depth of excavation shall be to an average of 2.5m below natural ground level.
5. Topsoil from the excavated areas shall be stockpiled and used where applicable in the rehabilitation process. 
6. No sales by wholesale or retail shall be undertaken from the site.
7. All vehicles’ loads entering and exiting the site shall be fully covered and secured prior to and upon leaving the site to prevent spread of material. 
8. Excavation for the Extractive Industry shall not occur within the following areas: 
a) 20 metres of the boundary of any land on which the excavation site is located; 
b) 20 metres of any land affected by a registered grant of easement; 
c) 40 metres of any thoroughfare; or 
d) 40 metres of any watercourse. 
9. Any storage of fuels or refuelling on site is to be located on a designated hardstand area location to the satisfaction of the Shire. 
10. Any fuel leakages or spills are to be cleaned up within 24 hours. 
11. The development must comply with the Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997 at all times. 
12. Prior to the commencement of development, the proponent must submit and have approved by the Shire a Weed Management Plan. 
13. Prior to the commencement of development, the proponent must undertake further discussions with the Shire and Main Roads WA to develop and implement an approved traffic management plan, for when truck >5 per day for site access with Rowes Road. 
14. A report detailing excavation activities and tonnages of material transported from the Extractive Industry site for the financial year period ending 30th June is to be submitted to the Shire by 31st July each year.  
15. The licensee shall pay an annual road maintenance contribution for the lifetime of the operation of $0.50 per estimated tonnage of material transported off-site. This fee will be advertised for a period of 35 days in accordance with section 6.19 of the Local Government Act 1995 prior to being charged.
16. Payment of the road maintenance contribution shall be made in advance, with the first payment due upon the commencement of operations. Thereafter, payment may be made on a quarterly basis. Advance payments made through the year shall be reconciled against the actual activities and additional payments shall be sought or credited as appropriate. 
17. Rehabilitation: 
a) Prior to the commencement of development a guarantee/bond or other acceptable form of security shall be lodged with or paid to the Shire for a sum of $10,000. To be returned to the licensee upon successful rehabilitation of the site, to the satisfaction of the Shire.
b) Upon decommissioning of the evacuation area, rehabilitation shall take place in accordance with the approved plan, or as otherwise stipulated.    
c) Any amendments or variations to the rehabilitation shall be approved in writing by the Shire within three months of the commencement of such operations. 
d) Materials imported for rehabilitation or other purposes shall be certified free of dieback or other plant diseases.

 Advice to applicant:
1. This approval is valid for a period of two (2) years. If the development has not substantially commenced within this period the approval will lapse and be of no further affect.
2. The applicant is advised that the Extractive Industry may require registration or a licence as a “Prescribed Premise” from the Department of Water and Environmental Regulating under Part V of the Environmental Protection Act 1986 and Schedule 1 of the Environmental Protection Regulations 1987 if it falls into one of the following categories: 
a) Category 12: Licensing is required if the material is screened, washed, crushed, ground, milled, sized or separated and more than 50,000 tonnes is processed per annum. 
b) Category 70: Registration is required if the material is screened, washed, crushed, ground, milled, sized or separated and more than 500 tonnes per annum but less than 50,000 tonnes per annum is processed. 
3. The applicant be advised that “should you be aggrieved by this decision, or any conditions imposed, there is a Right of Review under the Planning and Development Act 2005. An application for Review must be submitted in accordance with Part XIV of the Planning and Development Act within 28 days of the date of this decision to:
The State Administrative Tribunal GPO Box U1991 PERTH   WA   6845”

Monday, May 7, 2018

Free Range Poultry Farm


Proposed Free Range Poultry Farm – Lot 3751 Munbinea Road Hill River



Location: Lot 3751 Munbinea Road, Hill River

Applicant: AAA Egg Company Pty Ltd
Development Services Apps / Development

Date: 8 February 2018

PROPOSAL
The proponent is seeking planning approval for a free range
poultry farm located on Lot 3751 on the corner of Munbinea and
Cervantes Roads, Hill River.

BACKGROUND
Lot 3751 Munbinea Road (1939ha) has recently been subdivided
into two lots of approximately 1668.8ha and 270.2ha respectively.
The applicant proposes the egg farm development for the smaller
lot of 270.2ha (future lot 42), which is majority cleared of native
vegetation and of minuscule topography. The proponent outlines
this development has essentially the same design features as the
egg farm at Lot 25 Munbinea Road (approximately 2km northwest)
approved by Council in July 2017. AAA Egg Company Pty Ltd also
applied for a third egg farm at Lot 4 Mimegarra Road, Cataby. This
egg farm was recommended by Council to be approved by the
Wheatbelt JDAP in August 2014, however AAA Egg Company
withdraw their application before the JDAP Hearing due to further
environmental findings of the site.
The proponent intends to situate the egg farm in the middle of the
property with the nearest laying shed to any boundary being 200m
from Cervantes Road. No other boundary setbacks are given on
the site plan.

The proposal consists of:
·       12x egg laying sheds approximately 100m x 22.4m
·       2x 250m2 managers residences
·       50m x 7.5m workers accommodation and kitchen
·       16m x 26m office, cool-room and staff amenities
·       38m x 10m workshop and machinery shed
·       2x water tanks
·       8m x 6m gen shed
·       40m x 12m fodder shed
The maximum number of laying hens on site will be 360,000,
30,000 per shed.

The objective for ‘Rural’ zoned land in Local Planning Scheme
no.7 is:
To provide for a range of rural activities such as broadacre and
diversified farming so as to retain the rural character and amenity
of the locality, in such a way as to prevent land degradation and
further loss of biodiversity.
A free range poultry farm fits under the land use “animal
husbandry – intensive” Under the Scheme this is defined as:

animal husbandry - intensive” means premises used for keeping,
rearing or fattening of pigs, poultry (for either egg or meat
production), rabbits (for either meat or fur production) and other
livestock in feedlots”.

Agriculture Intensive, Agroforestry, and Animal Husbandry-
Intensive are “D” uses (discretionary approval) in a Public Drinking
Water Supply Area where Council will have due regard to the
potential impact on groundwater quality.
The proponent’s newly subdivided property is located outside the
northwest border of a Department of Water and Environmental
Regulation’s Priority 2 Public Drinking Water Source Area
(Cervantes Water Reserve) and approximately 16km from the
Water Corporation’s production bores.
The proponent’s property is however located in the predicative
Bassendean Precinct Special Control Area of Scheme. Whereby,
the Scheme states the following:

5.2 Bassendean Precinct Special Control Area
The Bassendean Precinct Area is an important environmental unit
in the central coast region. The area comprises deep porous
sands that are hydrologically connected to a number of wetlands
in the area. The area is noted as a significant area of internal
drainage which is particularly vulnerable to the use of fertilizers.

Purpose of the Special Control Area
1. To preserve the ecological values of the Bassendean Precinct
and interrelated wetlands.
2. To avoid development and land uses which would negatively
impact on the environmental values of the area.
3. To ensure that future land use in the area, including agriculture,
mining and recreational activities does not degrade the area.
4. To ensure that any development takes place in such a manner
so as to safeguard the environmental values of the area.

Relevant Considerations
In considering any rezoning request, subdivision or development
application the Local government will have regard to the following:

 Development applications for land within the Bassendean
Precinct should not be approved where the development may
result in an increase of nutrient release into the soil. The
impacts of proposals for aquaculture, commercial tree
plantations, earthworks (such as filling and excavation) and
intensive agriculture will be carefully assessed.

Local strategic planning guidance is given in the Shire’s Local
Planning Strategy - Rural Land Use and Settlement 2012:

8.1.2 Intensive Agriculture
The Council may refuse an application for planning consent where
in its opinion the proposed development will:

1. adversely affect the rural landscape;
2. adversely impact upon the agricultural use of the land and
adjoining/nearby areas;
3. cause detrimental environmental impacts;
4. result in unacceptable fire management risk;
5. place unacceptable servicing requirements which have not
been appropriately addressed by the applicant;
6. seek to ensure the impacts of the proposed use/development
can be adequately contained on the application site; and
7. in the opinion of the Council will result in an undesirable
planning outcome and will be contrary to the orderly and proper
planning of the locality.

Avoiding Landuse Conflict
Intensive animal industries such as feedlots, some horticultural
activities and piggeries have the potential for detrimental impacts
of water pollution, noise, dust, odour and possible soil erosion.
Location of these uses therefore requires careful consideration by
the Council in order to avoid environmental degradation and land
use conflict.

Department of Environment and Conservation (DWER*) guidelines
in relation to buffers to minimize land use conflicts between rural
industries and residential areas are summarised in Table 7. These
buffer distances should be considered as a starting point for
planning purposes and not the sole means of minimising the risk
of land use conflict.

Table 7: DEC recommended buffer distances between Rural
Industries and Residential areas*

INDUSTRY                                   BUFFER DISTANCE (metres)
Poultry industry                            500

Conflict can also occur between various forms of agricultural land
use and for many agricultural practices it is not feasible to contain
impacts within lot boundaries.
Greater awareness of, and adherence to, relevant Codes of
Practice for other agricultural land use activities can also help to
minimise land use conflict as well as off-site environmental
impacts.

Further local strategic planning guidance is given the Shire’s Draft
Local Planning Strategy 2016 (this strategy will supersede Local
Planning Strategy - Rural Land Use and Settlement 2012):

5.3.4 Avoiding land use conflict

Guidance for separation distances between Industrial land and
sensitive land uses is provided by the Environmental Protection
Authority. (EPA: Guidance for the Assessment of Environmental
Factors No. 3, June 2005). These generic separation distances
and buffer areas have been developed to complement and assist
the implementation of the SPP 4.1, State Industrial Buffer Policy. It
is intended to provide an approach to minimise the land use
conflict between industry, including rural industries and
surrounding sensitive land uses. These buffer distances are not a
substitute for taking all necessary measures to contain impacts onsite.

Registering of notifications on land titles alerting surrounding
landowners to amenity impacts may also be needed to limit
potential future land use conflicts. Those purchasing land will be
made aware that living in or close to an agricultural area may
impinge on their quality of lifestyle.

5.3.9 Accommodation for farm workers

As the agricultural activities diversify, costs increase for travel and
local circumstances change, there is a growing interest in
providing on-site accommodation for managers and full time, part
time and seasonal workers working on the property.
In principle, the shire supports the use of workers’ accommodation
on or near the properties on which they work subject to each
application being assessed on it’s the individual merits. When
considering application for farm workers accommodation on rural
land Council will take the following mattes into consideration:

·       suitable access to the property being provided;
·       the availability of services and infrastructures;
·       the management of potential adverse impacts and land use
conflict;
·       a preference to cluster similar uses on the property, and
·       the inclusion of conditions in the approval to prevent workers
accommodation being used as justification for a future
subdivision.

COMMENT
The following is comments on the major concerns of the proposed
poultry farm.

Services and Infrastructure
·       Cervantes and Munbinea Roads are sealed roads and provide good access to the site.
·       The applicant is advised to liaise with Western Power to ensure
there is sufficient power available to the site.

Land Capability

·       The applicant has advised that from a desktop study and site
visit the evaluation results indicate the site would be suitable for
its intended purpose of a free range egg production farm (see
attached Environmental Assessment).

Vehicle Access Requirements

·       A traffic management plan will be implemented to maintain and
enhance internal vehicle access areas and minimise the
potential for traffic conflict and generation of unreasonable
offsite noise or dust.
·       A dust management plan will also be implemented to minimise
dust generation with the potential for off-site impact.

Ground and Surface Water

·       The Department of Water and Environmental Regulation
(DWER) were consulted for comment on the proposal and
provided the following feedback on this matter:

The submitted proposal did not include any detailed information
regarding soil and water management during the construction of
the development. Particular attention should be paid to potential
weather effects on range areas that may impact on poultry, soil or
water resources including:

·       Free to range enclosures should be sited where the ground
surface is at least three metres above the water table to reduce
the risk of flooding. Where soils have low permeability,
floodwaters may transport nutrients from manure into wetlands.
·       A site where open areas of standing water may occur should be
avoided as wild birds may be attracted, exposing poultry to an
increased risk of disease.
·       A suitable area should be provided to allow roaming birds to
forage without causing significant soil damage, nutrient leaching
or loss of contaminant filtering vegetation to property
boundaries, waterways and water bodies.

It is recommended that should the development be approved that
conditions are enforced requiring the following plans to be
developed in consultation with the Department of Water and
Environmental Regulation (Regulatory Services (Water)):
·        Assessment of the wetland areas located on the property with
appropriate buffers and fringing vegetation defined.
·       Soil and Water Management Plan.
·       Stormwater Management Plan prepared in accordance with the
·       Stormwater Management Manual for Western Australia.

It is also recommended that any wastewater treatment and
disposal systems for the manager’s houses and/or donga
accommodation be designed in accordance with the Water Quality
Protection Note No. 70 – Wastewater treatment and disposal –
domestic systems.

Service Water

·       The applicant is liaising with DWER to gain permission to use
ground and surface water. It is believed there will be sufficient
quality and quantity of bore water to service the industry.

Remnant Vegetation and Wetland Protection Requirements

·       The site is largely cleared of original vegetation; however an
area of remnant banksia wood in the central part against
Cervantes Road and an uncleared wetland area in the north
west of the property exist. The proposed development is
located away from both these land characteristics.

Land Use Conflict

·       There is no wider potential for land use conflict from things such as spray drift or smoke between existing and proposed use.
·       The use will not sterilise land with potential for urban expansion or other long term land needs as there is unlikely to be any urban expansion in the vicinity.
·       There are no sensitive adjoining land uses.
·       The proposed development will form a uniform group with AAA Egg Company’s first site located approximately 2km northwest at Lot 25 Munbinea Road.
·       The development should not significantly detract from any scenic landscape and/or conservation attributes identified in the locality as the proposal is approximately 11km from Indian Ocean Drive.
·       Tronox request that the proximity of valuable mineral resources and possible future mining activities be communicated to the proponent.

Buffers with Adjacent Uses

·       As there are no existing dwellings or other sensitive land uses within 1000m of the site the application complies with both local and State buffer distance standards.

·       Further to Table 7 from the Shire’s Local Rural Planning Strategy illustrated above the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) have advised that there is a required minimum distance of 1000m required between any other poultry farm sheds. The proposed poultry farm complies with this requirement as the poultry farm will be located approximately 2km from the proponent’s other operating poultry farm in the Hill River region.
·       The proposed development will also comply with the 1000m
setback requirement from any sensitive land use stipulated
under the EPA Guidance Statement No. 3 – Guidance for the
Assessment of Environmental Factors – Separation Distances
between Industrial and Sensitive Land Uses.
Safety, Health and Amenity of the Locality
·       Given the site management protocols, separation distances
from existing dwellings and the very unlikely development of
urban land within the vicinity of the proposal, there are no
adverse impacts on nearby residents.
·       An advice note is provided to applicant to advise that the
proposal should at all times comply with the Biosecurity &
Agriculture (Stable Fly) Management Plan 2013 in order to
minimize the effects of stable flies on the community.

Size and Timing of the Operation
The applicant has advised the following:
·       The operation of a poultry farm is 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week commitment, however the applicant has stated standard
hours of operation for regular activity will be from 6am to 8pm
Monday to Sunday.
·       120m3 of manure is produced weekly.
·       Each poultry shed is depopulated approximately every 5.25
weeks creating 60tons of carcasses (11.43tons weekly).
·       General waste is approximately 2 to 3m3 per month.

Waste Disposal

·       A waste and manure management plan will ensure best
industry practices are implemented to ensure offsite impacts
are minimised.
·       Manure moisture levels are monitored and will be kept below
the level known by the farm managers to cause odour.
·       Manure from the poultry sheds will not be spread on the
property.
·       Manure will be removed from the poultry sheds twice weekly via
conveyor belts to waiting trucks who will remove the waste
offsite for further processing, reuse or disposal.
·       Normal mortality of birds will be collected daily or more
frequently if required. The disposal of such will also occur daily
either through refrigeration, composter or other approved
methods of disposal.

Conditions of approval will ensure all waste is disposed correctly
and safely and any adverse impacts of the waste to the
environment are minimised and are not simply transported
elsewhere. Conditions of approval will ensure all waste
transported offsite for:
·       further processing and/or reuse shall be to the standards stated
in the Environmental Guidelines for the Australian Egg Industry;
and
·       disposal is to a Department of Water and Environmental
Regulation Licensed Controlled Waste Facility under Part V of
the Environmental Protection Act 1986. However this is only
applicable to waste facilities which receive in excess of 1,000
tonnes annually under Schedule 1 of the Environmental
Protection Regulations 1987.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development
on consultation requested further information from the proponent
to make a comment on the proposal. In response to this Terry
Woodard, the Director of AAA Egg Company stated the following:

As submitted, we are proposing to build 12 x 30,000 bird
controlled environment, free-range poultry sheds that are the latest
technology equipment from Big Dutchman in Europe who are
global leaders in poultry housing systems.

The sheds design, equipment and construction will allow the hens
to spend up to 8 hours per day free ranging on reticulated
paddocks, the balance of the hens time will be spent inside the
shed where they will drink, feed, lay eggs and roam in the
controlled environment. The specifics of the daily life of the hens
meet or exceed the current Poultry Code of Practice 4th Edition as
well as the proposed Australian Animal Welfare Standards and
Guidelines for Poultry currently being reviewed.

AAA Egg Company is the leading producer of both cage and free
range eggs in Western Australia and operate multiple free range
sites in WA that strictly follow HACCP principals of food safety that
are incorporated into our QA systems to comply or exceed the
minimum standards identified by the various codes. We strongly
support the Standards and Guidelines for Poultry review becoming
mandatory legislation nationally to further strengthen the
requirements of egg producers.

Our farm managers are trained in HACCP based Quality
Assurance systems that are practical, effective and provide for
ongoing improvement via review and action methodologies.
We verify these systems through senior staff (including Livestock,
Operations and Quality Assurance managers) who are Certificate
IV in Training and Assessment to carry out ongoing internal
training and verification of our QA system.

Environmental Standards

Each of our sites including the Proposed Site No 2. Hill River
Poultry Farm are bound by a site specific environmental code of
practice to ensure we meet or exceed the standards (these can be
found in the attached documentation).
The environmental assessment report written in consultation with
Dr Peter Keating from Bio Science is derived from the relevant
local, state and national environmental standards (these can be
found in the attached documentation).
Given the above information it is the Officer’s view that if the site is
well managed to the protocols listed, there will be minimal impact
to neighbouring properties and the environment and is therefore
supported with conditions.

CONSULTATION
·       Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development;
·       Department of Water & Environment Regulation;
·       Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions;
·       Department of Fire and Emergency Services;
·       Local newspapers;
·       Surrounding land owners; and
·       Shire Officers.

STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT

·       Local Planning Scheme No 7
·       Environmental Protection Act 1986
·       Environmental Protection Regulations 1987

POLICY IMPLICATIONS

·       SPP 2.5 – Rural Planning Guidelines
·       SPP 2.9 – Water Resources
·       WAPC Fact Sheet – Poultry Farms
·       Environmental Code of Practice for Poultry Farms in Western Australia
·       Environmental Guidelines for the Australian Egg Industry
·       Poultry Code of Practice 4th Edition
·       Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Poultry
·       There are no local policy implications relevant to this item.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The proponent has paid a fee of $17,553 for the planning

STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS
·       Local Planning Strategy - Rural Land Use and Settlement 2012
·       Draft Local Planning Strategy 2016
·       2016 – 2026 Strategic Community Plan




Goal 1: Great Place for Residential and Business Development
Goal 2: Healthy, Safe and Active Community
Goal 5: Proactive and Leading Local Government

ATTACHMENTS

Circulated with the agenda are the following items relevant to this
report:
·       Subdivision Plan (Doc Id: 107611)
·       Site Plan (Doc Id: 107597)
·       Environmental Assessment (Doc Id: 107599)
·       Environmental Management Plan (Doc Id: 107596)
·       Schedule of Submissions (Doc Id: 107602)
(Marked 9.4.5)

VOTING REQUIREMENT
Simple majority


OFFICER RECOMMENDATION
That Council approve the planning application for a proposed
Free Range Poultry Farm on Lot 3751 Munbinea Road, Hill
River to AAA Egg Company subject to the following
conditions of approval:
1. The land use and development shall be undertaken in
accordance with the approved and stamped plans,
including the approved Environmental Management Plan.
2. This Approval is for an Animal Husbandry - Intensive
(Free Range Poultry Farm) only.
3. The use and development must be substantially
commenced within 3 years of the date of this approval.
4. Poultry shed design and management, management of
stock feed, water, waste products and all other aspects of
poultry farm operation are to comply with the
management guidelines set out in the Environmental
Code of Practice for Poultry Farms in Western Australia
(May 2004) and the Environmental Guidelines for the
Australian Egg Industry (June 2008).
5. The maximum number of laying hens shall be 360,000.
6. Crossovers, access and egress to the subject site from
Munbinea Road and any road works shall be located and
constructed to the satisfaction of the Executive Manager
Infrastructure and include all necessary drainage and
signage. Costs applicable to the construction of the
access point/s onto the site and any related issues shall
be borne by the proponent.
7. All internal roadway surfaces within the site are to be
constructed of a suitable material such as paving, road
base, limestone or course gravel and compacted to limit
dust generation to the satisfaction of the Shire’s Chief
Executive Officer.
8. The use and development must be conducted so that it
has minimum impact on the amenity of the area by reason
of:
I.                Transportation of materials, goods and commodities
to and from the premises;
II.              Appearance of any buildings, works and materials;
and
III.             The emission of noise, odour, vibration, dust,
wastewater, waste products or reflected light.

9. The applicant is to carry out of each of the elements of the
Environmental Management Plan including the audit
protocol set out within the Environmental Management
Plan.
10. Prior to the commencement of the development, an
amended Soil and Water Management Plan shall be
submitted to the Shire and approved by the Chief
Executive Officer.
11. Prior to the commencement of the development, a
Stormwater Management Plan prepared in accordance
with the Stormwater Management Manual for Western
Australia shall be submitted to the Shire and approved by
the Chief Executive Officer.
12. Prior to the commencement of the development, an
assessment of the wetland areas located on the property
with appropriate buffers and fringing vegetation defined
shall be submitted to the Shire and approved by the Chief
Executive Officer.
13. All waste transported offsite for further processing and/or
reuse shall be to the protocols of the Environmental
Guidelines for the Australian Egg Industry (June 2008).
14. All waste transported offsite for disposal shall be to a
Department of Water and Environmental Regulation
Licensed Controlled Waste facility under Part V of the
Environmental Protection Act 1986. This condition is not
applicable to facilities which receive less than 1,000
tonnes of waste annually under Schedule 1 of the
Environmental Protection Regulations 1987.
15. In the event of any adverse environmental conditions
caused by the proponent, the Chief Executive Officer may
impose conditions to rectify and remediate the
environment by and at the cost to the proponent.

Advice Notes:

Note 1: Further to this approval, the Applicant may be
required to submit working drawings and
specifications to comply with the requirements of
the Building Act 2011 and the Health Act 1911
which are to be approved by the Shire’s Manager
Building Services and/or Manager Environmental
Health prior to issuing a Building Licence.

Note 2: The Department of Health advises that any form of
pest control using pesticides must comply with the
Health (Pesticides) Regulations 2011.

Note 3: It is advised that the proposal should at all times
comply with the Biosecurity & Agriculture (Stable
Fly) Management Plan 2013 in order to minimize the
effects of stable flies on the community.

Note 4: It is advised that the proposal should at all times
comply with the provisions of the Food Act 2008
and related regulations, codes and guidelines and
in particular the Primary Production Standard in
relation to Egg production.

Department of Water and Environmental Regulation Advice
Notes:
·       Free to range enclosures should be sited where the ground
surface is at least three metres above the water table to
reduce the risk of flooding. Where soils have low
permeability, floodwaters may transport nutrients from
manure into wetlands.
·       A site where open areas of standing water may occur
should be avoided as wild birds may be attracted, exposing
poultry to an increased risk of disease.
·       A suitable area should be provided to allow roaming birds
to forage without causing significant soil damage, nutrient
leaching or loss of contaminant filtering vegetation to
property boundaries, waterways and water bodies.
·       Any wastewater treatment and disposal systems for the
manager’s houses and/or donga accommodation be
designed in accordance with the Water Quality Protection
Note No. 70 – Wastewater treatment and disposal –
domestic systems.

Western Power Advice Notes:
The applicant is to be made aware that before commencing
any work it is essential that they complete a Dial Before You
Dig enquiry to obtain the location and voltage of the Western
Power network.
Mining Advice Notes:
Tronox request that the proximity of valuable mineral
resources and future mining activities be accounted for in the
assessment of this development and communicated to the
proponent. If approved, the development must be undertaken
with the knowledge of being located adjacent to future mining
and mineral haulage activities, and the associated
interactions that will arise.